Home    Archive   RSS

All Who Wonder

Are Not Lost

3rd
Nov
Sun
  • ajcphotovault:

Fit for a queen
November 1960 – Uga, the University of Georgia mascot, poses with Homecoming Queen Sandra Wyatt (left) and Elaine Merrell.For more coverage of UGA sports – including more great photos – visit http://bit.ly/PC8ucN. For the latest sports headlines from the Atlanta area, visit http://www.ajc.com/s/sports/.Photo credit: Atlanta Journal-Constitution Photographic Archive

Uga I was a bit more trim than his progeny…

    ajcphotovault:

    Fit for a queen

    November 1960 – Uga, the University of Georgia mascot, poses with Homecoming Queen Sandra Wyatt (left) and Elaine Merrell.

    For more coverage of UGA sports – including more great photos – visit http://bit.ly/PC8ucN. For the latest sports headlines from the Atlanta area, visit http://www.ajc.com/s/sports/.

    Photo credit: Atlanta Journal-Constitution Photographic Archive

    Uga I was a bit more trim than his progeny…

    Tags:
    Notes: 30
    Reblogged from ajcphotovault
  • 8th
    Jul
    Mon
  • theatlantic:

The Geography of Bars and Restaurants 
Some cities really do have a bar on every corner.
[Image: Trulia]

"It’s so hard to spot Athens on this map" said no one, ever.  

    theatlantic:

    The Geography of Bars and Restaurants 

    Some cities really do have a bar on every corner.

    [Image: Trulia]

    "It’s so hard to spot Athens on this map" said no one, ever.  

    Tags:
    Notes: 586
    Reblogged from ilovecharts
  • 29th
    Aug
    Wed
  • cvilletochucktown:

Greatest minor league sports team name ever? 

Indeed it was.  I spent many a night when I was a kid cheering on the Whoopee and having no clue what everyone was giggling about.  

    cvilletochucktown:

    Greatest minor league sports team name ever? 

    Indeed it was.  I spent many a night when I was a kid cheering on the Whoopee and having no clue what everyone was giggling about.  

    Tags:
    Notes: 5
    Reblogged from cvilletochucktown
  • 8th
    May
    Tue
  • thingsthatpleaseme:

RIP

Few people captured kids’ imagination like Murice Sendak.  

    thingsthatpleaseme:

    RIP

    Few people captured kids’ imagination like Murice Sendak.  

    (Source: downeastandout)

    Tags:
    Notes: 109
    Reblogged from thingsthatpleaseme-deactivated2
  • 23rd
    Apr
    Mon

    Spring Fever 

    As this post will clearly show, things have been very busy in DC recently, which explains (but does not excuse) my lack of updates in well over a month.  In roughly chronological order, a summary of my spring thus far;

    -Cherry Blossom festival; you can’t talk about spring in DC without mentioning the famous  Cherry Blossoms that appear all over the place when the weather starts to get warm.  The tradition began 100 years ago when the Mayor Yukio Ozaki of Tokyo gave 3,000 cherry trees to the city of Washington as a gift to honor the friendship between the United States and Japan.  Today the blossoms bring tourists to DC in droves, and the resulting activity helps wake the city up after winter hibernation.  I was able to take in the blossoms around the tidal basin a couple of times, most notably during my lunch break while they were at their peak and on a 5:00 AM group run put on by a local running supply store (in hindsight, what was I thinking on that one?)  I also got to run in the Cherry Blossom 10-miler, one of the bigger spring races in DC with over 25,000 runners, which was a lot of fun.  I grew up with the Macon Cherry Blossom Festival as an annual staple, and although Macon claims to have more cherry trees than DC, the cherry blossoms served as a very fitting symbolic start to my first spring in the city.

    -Justice Sotomayor; I was able to hear Associate Supreme Court Justice Sonia Sotomayor speak at the University of DC law school.  This brought my grand total of SCOTUS experiences for the year to two, having heard Clarence Thomas speak at UGA Law this past fall.  The event included a great conversation between Justice Sotomayor and a professor at UDC Law, which is the only public law school in DC, and a reception that I unfortunately had to skip because I had dinner plans with a friend.  Just as with Justice Thomas, I was pleasantly surprised to hear how down to earth Justice Sotomayor (evinced by her appearance on Sesame Street, which was played at the event before the Justice was introduced), and it was very interesting to hear about her personal journey in the law.  

    -Home; I made a quick trip home in early April that was extremely busy but much needed.  The festivities included an interview in Atlanta, dinner with my grandparents before they headed to St. Simons for a golf trip, the annual family pilgrimage to Augusta National for a day at the Masters on Saturday, and Easter Sunday at my hometown church.  The only slight negative for the weekend; I missed Bubba Watson’s epic Masters victory during my flight back to DC.  Otherwise, it was pretty much perfect.  

    -Parents;  the very next weekend my parents made a trip up to DC, which was a lot of fun.  They’re good friends with the family I’m living with, so it was great that they got the chance to catch up and I got to show them around my new city.  They haven’t been to DC since I was about 8 or 9, so we spent some time doing the monuments and museums, but I’d say we spent at least half of the time they were here eating (Eastern Market breakfast and Hank’s Oyster Bar in Alexandria were favorites.)  I also got some exciting job/summer internship related news while they were here, which was very well timed and allowed for some festive celebrations.  Mom’s first words after I received the good news; “Finally, a paying job!”  Couldn’t agree more, mom. 

    -GSA; given all the recent media attention following the report on the now-infamous Western Regions Conference in Las Vegas, there has probably never been a more exciting time to be an intern with the General Services Administration Office of Inspector General than right now.  Although my internship ended last week (along with my classes), I was able to work with and follow the events surrounding the scandal from a very unique perspective.  I helped proofread the report on the conference, helped create materials that helped the Inspector General prepare for last week’s Congressional hearings, and got to attend one of those hearings as well.  There’s been plenty of media coverage on the topic, but as usual I prefer Jon Stewart and Stephen Colbert's unique approach to reporting and punditry. 

    This is a painfully short summary of recent events, but I’ll be doing a few more detailed posts on things that deserve more than a passing mention.  I’ll be splitting my time between DC and Atlanta this summer, and though I should be pretty busy there are lots of exciting developments coming that I look forward to sharing here.  

    Tags:
    23rd
    Apr
    Mon
  • New post coming soon.  In the meantime, this is incredible.  
justapinchofsouth:

You may not be able to tell it from his accent, but we all know Stephen Colbert is proudly from South Carolina.
And apparently he really understands bow-ties, as he should.

    New post coming soon.  In the meantime, this is incredible.  

    justapinchofsouth:

    You may not be able to tell it from his accent, but we all know Stephen Colbert is proudly from South Carolina.

    And apparently he really understands bow-ties, as he should.

    (Source: meljoueduvioloncelle)

    Tags:
    Notes: 90
    Reblogged from justapinchofsouth
  • 11th
    Mar
    Sun
  • Georgia on my mind.  Looking forward to being back in the Peach State in a couple of weeks for The Masters and Easter with my family.  

    Georgia on my mind.  Looking forward to being back in the Peach State in a couple of weeks for The Masters and Easter with my family.  

    Tags:
    Notes: 112
    Reblogged from fuckyeahgeorgia
  • 11th
    Mar
    Sun

    Lobbying

    Lobbying is one of those professions that is very uniquely DC, and last week I was able to get a pretty cool insight into the whole process.  Our class met at the office of a large law firm on K street (the primo address for the DC legal scene) to hear from a fellow Double Dawg with a very impressive and diverse practice portfolio, which includes lobbying (or “governmental affairs” in DC parlance.)  I was particularly interested in his work because 1) one of his biggest clients is the University of Georgia, for which he is the primary lobbyist in DC, and 2) I’m applying for a couple of jobs that could include some governmental affairs work, so I was all ears during his presentation.

    Many people might not know that lobbying is a constitutional right, guaranteed by the First Amendment (i.e. “Congress shall make no law…abridging the freedom…to petition the government for a redress of grievances.”)  That being the case, the ability to lobby is likely here to stay despite the many concerns people may have with private interests attempting to influence legislation and policy.  One of the many things we talked about in class was the largely negative perception that people have of lobbyists and the work that they do. 

    Out of that conversation, I came to the conclusion that the negative perception of lobbyists is largely the same as the negative perception of lawyers, which I guess is twice as bad when a lawyer is himself a lobbyist.  Although both professions involve tasks that some people might view as unsavory or include some particularly distasteful people in their ranks (i.e. Jack Abramoff), a lot of the negative perceptions could be cleared up by some clarifications.  For lobbyists, many people (myself formerly included in this category) don’t understand that their job primarily consists of providing legislators with full and accurate information relevant to their particular client or cause.  This doesn’t seem to make much sense, because by nature lobbyists are trying to influence legislators to move a particular way on an issue or piece of legislation, and as such you would think they would try to skew the information to help favor that position.  However, after hearing more about what lobbyists actually do and how legislators handle them, it makes perfect sense that the information would be presented in a candid and honest way.  As the attorney made very clear to us, if a lobbyist provides inaccurate or skewed information that a legislator then acts on, and they later come to find out about it, that lobbyist and the organization he or she represents will effectively never have access to that legislator again. 

    Another thing that I had never thought of was the ability of legislators to improve legislation for everyone involved, not just their particular client or cause.  The attorney we met with gave an example from the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (which the Supreme Court will be hearing oral arguments on in just a couple of weeks.)  He and lobbyists for other colleges and universities were able to get some language placed in the bill that addressed institutions of higher education that provided health insurance for students, an area that legislators had previously overlooked as they were writing up the bill.  Had that language not been inserted, there would have been numerous implementation problems for those colleges and universities and their students that would likely have led to costly litigation for a lot of people. 

    But enough of the serious stuff, I also wanted to quickly write about the urban legend behind the term “lobbyist.”  Legend has it that President Ulysses S. Grant, who enjoyed a cold adult beverage every now and then, would often walk from the White House to the nearby Willard Hotel, where he would partake in brandy and cigars in their famous Round Robin Bar.  When people found out about this, they would make a habit of hanging out in the lobby of the hotel to try and grab the attention of the President and other officials with him and attempt to influence legislation and policy.  The President apparently started calling these petitioners “those damn lobbyists,” and the name stuck.  Like most urban legends, this isn’t the entire story, but it’s still an interesting one and also gave me a destination for drinks a few weeks ago.  I stopped by the Willard Hotel one night to walk around and have a drink in the Round Robin Bar…the lobby and the bar are both pictured (poorly) above.  It’s a beautiful building, I don’t think much has changed with the interior since the Grant’s term as President, and I can see why it was his preferred watering hole. 

    Hope all my fellow Law Dawgs are enjoying Spring Break so far, I’m staying in DC and working all week but at least will not have to worry about class at night, so I’m looking forward to a few days of authentic DC (by which I mean, of course, going to happy hours.)  Cheers to that!  

    Tags:
    26th
    Feb
    Sun

    The AG

    Two weeks ago I had an opportunity that I’m guessing few people in DC ever have, especially transient law students from Georgia; I met our current Attorney General, Eric Holder, and sat in on an almost hour-long Q&A session with him and the other students in my program.  This kind of thing is a law student’s nerd dream, and was definitely the highlight of my time in DC so far.

    A few basics for the uninitiated (i.e. those smart enough to not attend law school or follow politics); the Attorney General serves as the head of the Department of Justice and is a cabinet-level position.  Effectively, he (or she) is the chief lawyer in the United States, dealing with legal affairs and law enforcement on behalf of the federal government.  Eric Holder is the first African American to hold the position, and has served since February 3, 2009.  In short, he is an extremely powerful, influential, smart, and busy man, and I was shocked when I heard that we would have the chance to meet him, not to mention talk with him for over an hour, in the middle of a work day. 

    To try to keep this story as brief as possible, myself and the other 14 people in my program, along with the program coordinator, met at the Robert F. Kennedy Justice Department Building (aka “Main Justice”) to go through the routine security process and then be escorted up to the AG’s suite by someone from his staff.  Main Justice is a beautiful building, and more pieces of art, sculptures, and murals than any other federal department building, most of which was the result of the New Deal works program.  We waited for a few minutes in a reception area (with Secret Service agents all over the place,) then were taken into the AG’s conference room.  

    While waiting for the AG, his official photographer told us a little bit about the room; it was used by Robert Kennedy as his office during his term as Attorney General, during which time it featured both a stuffed marlin over the fireplace and a stuffed tiger along one wall (very standard office decor.)  The room also carries a lot of evidence of RFK’s kids, who often played there while he was working.  For example, one of the ornately carved wooden doors that leads out of the room has a few pockmarks on it, where some of his kids shot the door with BB guns (they had missed the target that RFK had put on the door for them to aim at.)  Another very cool thing about the room are the two murals that I’ve posted pictures of.  Both were painted by Leon Kroll in 1935, and are on opposing walls of the conference room.  Whenever the AG is in a meeting, he faces the mural entitled “Justice Defeated,” which we were told is meant to serve as a reminder of the magnitude and importance of his position, and the consequences that could follow if does not perform his job to the utmost of his ability.  Very cool stuff.    

    While we were all still looking around the office and taking everything in, the AG walked in suddenly and we lined up to take individual and group pictures with him (which I’ll definitely post here as soon as they send us the copies.)  The magnitude of the situation hadn’t really hit me until we sat down around the conference table, and somehow I was in the seat directly to Holder’s right.  To say that I was wide awake and paying full attention would be a vast understatement.  He made a few brief remarks about living and working in DC, public service as a career path, and his work as the Attorney General, and then opened up the floor for questions.  

    For almost a full hour we had a great conversation with the Attorney General, with questions ranging from how he spends his time at work, the kinds of things he does for fun, his relationship with President Obama, etc. etc.  I asked him about his career path (he’s worked in both the public and private sectors) and the things that convinced him to work in government rather than the more lucrative law firm world.  Overall it was a great conversation, and I was surprised to hear how laid back and down to earth he was.  Highlights from the conversation include the fact that Holder is Linsane (he’s from the Bronx and loves the Knicks, but his money is on Miami to win it all this year), and that his favorite thing to do to unwind is watch Sunday night HBO with his wife (favorite shows are Boardwalk Empire and True Blood…seeing that True Blood is my guilty TV pleasure, I particularly enjoyed hearing this.)    

    To avoid breaking my golden rule (i.e. never talking about my politics/personal beliefs via social media) I’ll simply say that this was a great experience and offered a rare look at the workings of the most powerful and influential attorney in the US.  The hours spent reading and discussing cases throughout law school can cause you to lose sight of the larger scope and scale of our legal system, but this (very) up close and personal look at the Attorney General and the Department of Justice brought all that home to me in a very real way, and was an experience that I won’t soon forget.   

    Tags:
    12th
    Feb
    Sun
  • Things I like about DC

    At this point I think it’s very safe to say that I love living and working in DC.  After more than a month of doing so, I’ve finally been able to pinpoint at least a few of the reasons why;

    -The size.  Although DC is our nation’s capital, and obviously a major world center, it’s a relatively small city, making it very easy to manage and navigate.  The entire city is only 68.3 square miles (Athens, GA for a little perspective, is 118.2 square miles) and has a permanent population of 617,996, ranking it as the 24th largest city in the country by population.  The metro area, stretching into Virginia and Maryland, is obviously much larger in size and population, and a vast majority of people who work in DC (71.2% of them) commute in from the surrounding suburbs and residential districts. Besides weekday working hours, therefore, it’s very easy for a newcomer like me not to feel swallowed in the crowd, and instead the city’s small size is conducive to learning my way around and starting to build a good network here.  Not only is it geographically small, but the city has a very small scale and feel to it as well.  The Height of Buildings Act, passed by Congress in 1899, limited the height of any building in the city to a very modest 110 feet.  Therefore, rather than the towering skyscrapers of NYC or Chicago, the city has a very low skyline, with only a couple of notable exceptions popping up here and there (i.e. the Capitol Building, Washington Monument, Old Post Office, and National Cathedral.)    

    -Getting around.  Another great thing about DC is how easy it is to get around the city.  I’m a huge fan of public transportation/mass transit, and the metrorail (subway) system, the second largest system in the US, has made it possible for me to get around very easily without ever needing a car.  I’ve only driven my car three times since I’ve been here, and haven’t needed to fill up with gas since I stopped in Richmond, Virginia during my drive up on January 3rd.  The trade off is that I spend about $20 a week on metro fares, and of course there’s a little more walking involved in getting to and from the various stations, but I don’t really mind either of these things (the walking especially.)  The other thing that I can’t wait to take advantage of is the Capital Bikeshare system.  I saw a very similar program in London last summer, and was surprised/excited to find out about it when I got to DC.  Essentially you pay a membership fee for a fixed amount of time, and then have access to 1200 bikes spread over the city in 140 docking stations for up to half an hour for no charge.  I’m looking forward to commuting via bike once the weather warms up a little bit.

    -Visitors.  One of the great things about living in a major city is the constant stream of visitors.  Just this week I was surprised by a tweet from a friend from my hometown who was in town for part of the week and the weekend for a conference.  He goes to UNC and got here the day of the UNC-Duke basketball game, so I was able to meet up with him to watch the game at the UNC Alum bar.  On Thursday night another friend who’s in law school at UVA was in town for a moot court competition the next morning, and I was able to grab dinner with her and a couple of other friends from college that night.  In a couple of weeks I have another friend coming to town for a conference, and my parents are planning a trip for the Cherry Blossom Festival this spring.  It’s great being able to show people around the city, and has almost made me feel like I actually know what I’m talking about most of the time. 

    -Dawgs/Georgians.  Y’all saw this coming.  DC has the largest population of UGA Alums outside of the state of Georgia, and there are a ton of new Dawgs to meet and old friends to catch up with.  So far I’ve only been able to go to one DC Dawgs event, which was a happy hour on the same night as the State of the Union address, but I’ve also been able to meet up with a ton of friends from college, or am in the process of making plans to do so, which has been awesome.  I’m also hoping to go to one of the events for the Georgia State Society, a group of native Georgians who have made their home in DC.  I couldn’t be happier to be in DC, but it’s also great to be able to have those constant reminders of home right here in the city.  Doesn’t hurt my job search process, either. 

    -Things to do/people to meet.  DC is a very vibrant city, and there’s always something cool going on and exciting new people to meet.  Even though I spend most of my time during the week at work or in class, there is still the occasional spare hour or two at night (and of course the weekends) to explore the city, and I’ve tried to do that as much as possible.  Sometimes this happens by accident; just yesterday, as I was having lunch with the aforementioned friend from my hometown on Capitol Hill, people in their underwear started walking past the door of the restaurant, and a crowd was growing outside.  This naturally caught our attention, and upon further inspection we realized we had stumbled upon the Cupid Undie Run, a short road race run in your skivvies to benefit a juvenile cancer charity, reminiscent of Atlanta’s Santa Speedo Run.  An interesting diversion from lunch to say the least, but a great example of how there’s always something going on in the District.  Besides the sheer amount of things to do here, it’s also a very young city, and as it’s often put, “everyone is from everywhere,” so it’s been great meeting people from all over the country/world who have settled in DC.

    There are plenty of other reasons why I’m enjoying my time here, but this list at least starts to address them.  Wonder how many more reasons I can discover before I return to the Peach State for my final year of law school?

    Tags:
  • »

    Accent Red by Neil Talwar